Nutrition



Why Breakfast Is the Most Important Meal of the Day?

It has been proven that students who eat breakfast have higher test scores than students who skip the morning meal.

Breakfast is often described as the most important meal of the day, and rightfully so -- it not only provides important daily nutrients such as protein, fiber, calcium and carbohydrates, but it also helps improve school performance, allowing students to do better on tests, according to the Food and Nutrition Service. If your child feels tired or has difficulty concentrating during the day, consider adding breakfast to his or her routine.

Improved Grades

Eating breakfast can improve cognitive performance, test scores and achievement scores in students, especially in younger children. According to a study published in the journal “Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine," students who increased their participation in school breakfast programs had significantly higher math scores than students who skipped or rarely ate breakfast. As an added benefit, the group of students who increased breakfast participation also had decreased rates of tardiness and absences. Eating breakfast is a social event and students enjoy meeting in the morning and having breakfast with their friends.

Increased Concentration

Students who eat a low-glycemic, balanced breakfast may have better concentration and more positive reactions to difficult tasks than students who eat a carbohydrate-laden breakfast. According to research published in “Physiology and Behavior," students given a low-glycemic breakfast were able to sustain attention longer than children given a high-glycemic breakfast. Children following the low-glycemic breakfast plan also had improved memory and fewer signs of frustration when working on school tasks. School breakfasts provide healthy whole grains, protein, fruits and juice and milk.

Weight Maintenance

Eating breakfast regularly may also help students maintain a healthy weight. According to a study published in “Public Health Nutrition," children who skipped breakfast in the morning were more likely to overeat and have a lower overall diet quality than children who ate breakfast every day. This led to increased body mass index, or BMI, measurements. Encourage your student to eat breakfast each day and set a healthy lifestyle routine.

Considerations

While eating any breakfast is better than skipping breakfast altogether, some choices are better than others. Carbohydrate-only breakfasts, such as bagels and toast, can give energy for one to two hours, while complete breakfasts that contain a balance of protein, fat and carbohydrates can keep blood sugar levels steady for hours, according to MealsMatter.org. School Breakfast provides all these.  Why not check out school breakfast and jump start your day every day?





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